[[ PDF ]] ✅ The Social Contract Author Jean-Jacques Rousseau – Rvtrek.info

The Social Contract Man Is Born Free And Everywhere He Is In Chains These Are The Famous Opening Words Of A Treatise That Has Not Ceased To Stir Vigorous Debate Since Its First Publication In Rejecting The View That Anyone Has A Natural Right To Wield Authority Over Others, Rousseau Argues Instead For A Pact, Or Social Contract , That Should Exist Between All The Citizens Of A State And That Should Be The Source Of Sovereign Power From This Fundamental Premise, He Goes On To Consider Issues Of Liberty And Law, Freedom And Justice, Arriving At A View Of Society That Has Seemed To Some A Blueprint For Totalitarianism, To Others A Declaration Of Democratic Principles My first contact with the Social Contract transpired back in those doldrums which is usually just dumped into a general catch all called teenage It was profound, it was moving and enlightening, so naturally I didn t know anyone else I could discuss this book with as nobody else seems to be pondering the bigger things in life my classmates and peers were completely useless in my hopes to talk about this work, and the societal elders I was familiar with were equally ignorant of the importance of My first contact with the Social Contract transpired back in those doldrums which is usually just dumped into a general catch all called teenage It was profound, it was moving and enlightening, so naturally I didn t know anyone else I could discuss this book with as nobody else seems to be pondering the bigger things in life my classmates and peers were completely useless in my hopes to talk about this work, and the societal elders I was familiar with were equally ignorant of the importance of this timeless masterpiece and the latter may bedisturbing as these people were generally given the title of teacher On the few occasions where I ve been afforded the opportunity to invoke the name of this classic, most people think I m spouting gibberish and have lost my f cking mind of course these are usually very drunken instances, such as the time I went totally apeshit on a hotel pool deck I usually keep discussion of this book to a minimum these days, only shrieking This is a breach of Social Contract when being attacked or otherwise having my life or livelihood threatened this fails to convey the importance of Rousseau s legacy This grand, conceptual book also happens to be one of the last things worth a wad of zebra jit to come out of France, and though most scholars will be quick to note that the thoughts contained within were instrumental to the advent of the French Revolution, nobody seems to give it mention for turning about a dozen kids into lifelong socialists every year a truly remarkable feat in a diseased, gluttonous, avaricious, cesspool like 1990s America All I can offer about the book is this most people, the masses of simpletons clogging up the works and forward progress of the world at large, are simply not ready for this book Luckily, Rousseau and his Social Contract don t play that weak shit this was written simply because Jean Jacques had the foresight to recognize something is perverting the ties that bind men and something had better be done about it before everyone is swept into a cataclysmic societal vacuum which none dare wish for civil unrest and entropy spiraling the better part of a billion people into an Armageddon like madness The days of Apocalypse Ragnorak But enough of that banter, this book succeeds because the debated subject is social structure and the proper rule of the people while still managing to keep some semblance of individual nature within it the unthinkable task of creating an ideal government The book isn t perfect, and I do believe it actually strives to be, which can be a deterrent at points nothing is worse than hearing an acolyte of some great truth expound upon something which just isn t correct We can leave that by the wayside, for the foundation for Rousseau s bothersome suggestions is solid and worthy of respect Fully deserving inclusion as one of Pengiun s heralded Great Ideas series, and as a sidenote, not only is this odd sized paperback packaging the housing of such a phenomenal work, but the edition itself is f cking gorgeous, contrasting in bold blue and white while not even being boldly colored , and an incredible debossed styling Du Contrat Social Principes du droit Politique The Social Contract Principles of Political Rights, Jean Jacques Rousseau The Social Contract, originally published as On the Social Contract or, Principles of Political Rights by Jean Jacques Rousseau, is a 1762 book in which Rousseau theorized about the best way to establish a political community in the face of the problems of commercial society, which he had already identified in his Discourse on Inequality 1754 The Social Contract help Du Contrat Social Principes du droit Politique The Social Contract Principles of Political Rights, Jean Jacques Rousseau The Social Contract, originally published as On the Social Contract or, Principles of Political Rights by Jean Jacques Rousseau, is a 1762 book in which Rousseau theorized about the best way to establish a political community in the face of the problems of commercial society, which he had already identified in his Discourse on Inequality 1754 The Social Contract helped inspire political reforms or revolutions in Europe, especially in France The Social Contract argued against the idea that monarchs were divinely empowered to legislate Rousseau asserts that only the people, who are sovereign, have that all powerful right 1974 1348 1345 1329 1347 The one star rating does not mean I don t recommend reading The Social Contract Everyone should It s that important, that influential and reading this was certainly eye opening One star does not mean this was tedious, dry or difficult In fact this treatise is not long, is easy to understand and can be read in a few hours And Rousseau can certainly turn a phrase Lots and lots that s quotable in this book But I don t simply not like the book which on Goodreads means one star I absolutely The one star rating does not mean I don t recommend reading The Social Contract Everyone should It s that important, that influential and reading this was certainly eye opening One star does not mean this was tedious, dry or difficult In fact this treatise is not long, is easy to understand and can be read in a few hours And Rousseau can certainly turn a phrase Lots and lots that s quotable in this book But I don t simply not like the book which on Goodreads means one star I absolutely despise this book and everything it stands for Leo Strauss called Machiavelli the teacher of evil and goodness knows I have nothing kind to say about Marx But both feel clean and wholesome in comparison to Rousseau Machiavelli at least is open about urging there is no place for morals in politics, but Rousseau is positively Orwellian He begins the first chapter of Social Contract with the stirring worlds Man is born free and everywhere is in chains But though he speaks of liberty and democracy it s clear that his ideal state as he defines it is totalitarian Those who don t want any part of his state, who won t obey, should be forced to be free Locke argued inalienable rights included life, liberty, and property governments are instituted to secure those rights For Rousseau, life, liberty and property are all things you give wholly to the state retaining no individual rights Rousseau states Whoever refuses to obey the general will shall be compelled to do so by the whole body the social contract gives the body politic absolute power over all its members when the prince says to him It is expedient for the State that you should die, he ought to die.Even Rousseau thought his ideal system couldn t work in large territories He ideally wanted direct democracy, with all citizens meeting in assembly such as in the ancient city state of Athens, not representative democracy, which he doesn t see as true democracy And the larger the state, theabsolute in its powers andautocratic the government should be lest it fall into selfish anarchy Alissa Ardito says in the Introduction to my edition that Politics is also about language, talking, negotiating, arguing and for that Rousseau had no need and little patience The goal in The Social Contract is always about consensus, and in the end one suspects what Rousseau finally wanted was silence You cannot have liberty or democracy while shutting up and shutting down anyone who dissents from the general will And then there s Rousseau s urging of a civil religion, where one literally worships the state What you get then is the obscenity of a state as the Democratic People s Republic of Korea, whose only nod to democracy is in the name, and where its leader takes on a quasi religious status Can I see any good in this treatise I can see the form the United States took in the discussion of a mix between monarchy President , aristocracy Senate, Supreme Court and democracy Congress and checks and balances between them But such features are also discussed in Locke s Second Treatise of Government and in Montesquieu s The Spirit of the Laws, both of which predate The Social Contract In fact, Rousseau s categories of government can even trace its roots to Aristotle So, what good I can see in it is hardly original Well, and The Social Contract did argue for sovereignty being lodged in the people rather than a Divine Right of Kings it s supposed to have inspired the French Revolution, and its cry of liberty, equality, fraternity If so, it s easier to understand why the French Revolution turned into the Reign of Terror I do consider this a must read, and I m glad I read it It s enlightening, like turning over a rock to see all the nasty things that were hiding underneath My friend Ahmad is right this is an important and not dry book that we all Need to Revisit Remember when Freedom was a glorious ideal a fresh, untrammelled new territory to explore at will Look back Think of Thomas Paine in America, Edmund Burke in England, Rousseau s bright confr res among the philosophes all of them trumpeted the Dawn of a Fresh New Day.Of course all of our own early days were filled with its fresh air And then, back then the early days of the Enlightenment, th My friend Ahmad is right this is an important and not dry book that we all Need to Revisit Remember when Freedom was a glorious ideal a fresh, untrammelled new territory to explore at will Look back Think of Thomas Paine in America, Edmund Burke in England, Rousseau s bright confr res among the philosophes all of them trumpeted the Dawn of a Fresh New Day.Of course all of our own early days were filled with its fresh air And then, back then the early days of the Enlightenment, that powerhouse of political ideology that conceived the Golden Image of TRUE democracy The world was coming of age What happened to us all to spoil all that Well, the world grew older and so did we Jean Jacques Rousseau, though, all appearances to the contrary, was at heart a Golden Ager Whatever we may think, his philosophy was not Utopian Rousseau just wanted to return to the Age of Innocence, like Auden though perhaps a little bitna vely than Wystan, and to universal brotherhood Which serves him well here.Oh, those lost ideals Yes, he was every bit as na ve as we were in our early years and I was a lot probablyso than a lot of you, too Still, he never stopped HOPING, in spite of all the bullies and naysayers But like Jean Jacques, I know my teenaged springtime was anything but sound The serpent had long since reached the centre of the apple Rousseau like me attempted extensive damage control, and the galloping extr mes of his writing belie that constantly thwarted rationalization He was perhaps successful, at least outwardly, though inwardly most of his life was lived on tenterhooks.But now maybe you, like so many of US old Boomers, remain a partial stranger in this brave new world we see around us And we can never go back to the Golden Age, it seems Why Because we all have seen the enemy and he is us Because he is ALWAYS there with us, even in disguise in these faraway times.You know, we moderns grew up faster because we were in sync with Accelerated Modern Time, and because the serpent is in plain view these days.Caught in that music, all neglectMonuments of undying intellect.So, to so many of us, Jean Jacques fades back into the chipped and forgotten statuary of the Enlightenment But MAYBE HIS Hope is still a valid GROWNUP option And as for the actual Rousseau What he was, he was.What he is fated to becomeDepends on us.Don t you see Just because we ve all been hurt and have fallen from grace is no excuse for our omnipresent modern cynicism.And as Auden s poetic words can also apply to the way we see this tarnished 18th century idol, perhaps Rousseau s historical fate, along with Democracy s and the World s, also depends on US.Our attitudes Our emotions We re sad sacks when we should be can do er s And if we re as idealistic as he was, these things will depend on having a grown up sense of HOPE It s time we revisited that Golden Ideal There IS still room for goodness, decency and hope in this fallen world if we keep one ear open to the postmodernist mindset.And The Social Contract has all of those virtues in Spades

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