[Epub] ↠ They Thought They Were Free Author Milton Sanford Mayer – Rvtrek.info

They Thought They Were Free What No One Seemed To Notice, Said A Colleague Of Mine, A Philologist, Was The Ever Widening Gap, After 1933, Between The Government And The People Just Think How Very Wide This Gap Was To Begin With, Here In Germany And It Became Always Wider You Know, It Doesn T Make People Close To Their Government To Be Told That This Is A People S Government, A True Democracy, Or To Be Enrolled In Civilian Defense, Or Even To Vote All This Has Little, Really Nothing, To Do With Knowing One Is Governing Excerpt


About the Author: Milton Sanford Mayer

Milton Sanford Mayer, a journalist and educator, was best known for his long running column in The Progressive magazine, founded by Robert Marion LaFollette, Sr in Madison, Wisconsin.Mayer, raised a Reform Jew, was born in Chicago, the son of Morris Samuel Mayer and Louise Gerson He graduated from Englewood High School, where he received a classical education with an emphasis on Latin and langu Milton Sanford Mayer, a journalist and educator, was best known for his long running column in The Progressive magazine, founded by Robert Marion LaFollette, Sr in Madison, Wisconsin.Mayer, raised a Reform Jew, was born in Chicago, the son of Morris Samuel Mayer and Louise Gerson He graduated from Englewood High School, where he received a classical education with an emphasis on Latin and languages He studied at the University of Chicago from 1925 to 1928 but did not earn a degree he told the Saturday Evening Post in 1942 that he was placed on permanent probation in 1928 for throwing beer bottles out a dormitory window He was a reporter for the Associated Press 1928 29 , the Chicago Evening Post, and the Chicago Evening American.During his stint at the Post he married his first wife Bertha Tepper the couple had two daughters In 1945 they were divorced, and two years later Mayer married Jane Scully, whom he referred to as Baby in his magazine columns.At various times, he taught at the University of Chicago, the University of Massachusetts, and the University of Louisville, as well as universities abroad He was also a consultant to the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions.Mayer s most influential book was probably They Thought They Were Free The Germans, 1933 45, a study of the lives of a group of ordinary Germans under the Third Reich, first published in 1955 by the University of Chicago Press Mayer became a member of the Religious Society of Friends or Quakers while he was researching this book in Germany in 1950 he did not reject his Jewish birth and heritage At various times, he taught at the University of Chicago, the University of Massachusetts, and the University of Louisville, as well as universities abroad He was also a consultant to the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions.Mayer is also the author of What Can a Man DoUniv of Chicago Press and is the co author, with Mortimer Adler, of The Revolution in Education Univ of Chicago Press.Mayer died in 1986 in Carmel, California, where he and his second wife made their home Milton had one brother, Howie Mayer, who was the Chicago journalist that broke the Leopold and Loeb case



10 thoughts on “They Thought They Were Free

  1. says:

    They Wanted It They Got It And They Liked ItMilton Mayer was that rarest of writers a journalist who knew his job was to create interesting facts and a philosopher who knew that facts are meaningless without


  2. says:

    They wanted it they got it and they liked it In 1952, American journalist Milton Mayer moved his family to Marburg, Germany, a small town near Frankfurt There, he set about to answer the question plaguing the world s


  3. says:

    Shortly after the war Milton Mayer, an American Jew of German heritage, and his wife, Jane, moved into a mid sized German city Concealing his religious background, Mayer passed as an authentic, returning German and was thereb


  4. says:

    Seven years after the collapse of Hitler s regime, Milton Sanford Mayer, an American Jewish journalist of German heritage, traveled to Germany in an effort to understand how and why Nazism had developed in Germany He spends a year in


  5. says:

    You should read this book if you think that you are free.This is an old book, originally published in 1955, but it isrelevant today than ever before Today the U.S government openly arrests people without probable cause, detains them indefinite


  6. says:

    They Thought They Were Free the germans 1933 45Milton Mayer author Published by the University of Chicago PressFirst published in 1955 the book has the advantage of being a collection of recollections about the conditions of life in the small town of K


  7. says:

    Excellent, sad, and troubling The author, a Jewish American, lived in Germany after World War II, in the 1950s, as a professor at a small provincial college This book is an account of his many conversations with ten different German men about their experiences


  8. says:

    Great book, if not a bit frightening Frightening because you can really see that tyranny can happening anywhere and at any time It really puts you in the shoes of ordinary Germans Would I really stand up to tyranny...


  9. says:

    They Thought They Were Free was first published in 1955 In 1966 it was reprinted with a new foreword by the author I read it for the first time as a college undergrad and activist in the early 1970s It exerted a lasting influence on my emerging view of the world Perhaps its mos


  10. says:

    I found it a little difficult to rate this book The first part, relating personal interviews with former Nazi party members was fascinating and a little troubling when looking at some of the events in terms of modern developments The second half of the book, though, read like an attempt


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *